August 8th, 2006

lake Scandi canoeing (Pete & kids in the

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Aurora & a piece of grass with vines growing up around it like a wand... which she found on a forest walk...

A common family scene at the family cabin: discussions out at the picnic table until the sun sets...

Athena dancing & Wren watching with a wild turkey feather she found on the forest walk...
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drawing of me

yeah, so I want to go home & check for this now: ug.

I've always hated air freshners, and never used them - same for mothballs. But there's something in the cleaning closet that sets me off in the same "bleh" reaction as I get to air freshners, I wonder if one of our floor cleaners or something has this crap in it? I always clean w/vinegar but we "have other cleaners" sitting in that cleaning closet & wow do they STINK> I hope they aren't these toxins!



Air Fresheners Linked to Lung Damage

Chemical in Air Fresheners, Toilet Deodorizers, Mothballs Cuts Lung Function

By Daniel DeNoon
WebMD Medical News
Reviewed By Louise Chang, MD
on Thursday, July 27, 2006


July 27, 2006 -- A chemical found in air fresheners, toilet deodorizers, and mothballs -- and in the blood of 96% of Americans -- may harm the lungs.

The finding comes from a National Institutes of Health study that measured lung function and blood levels of 11 household chemicals in 953 U.S. adults. All 11 chemicals are volatile organic compounds -- chemicals given off as gasses from common household products.

Only one was linked to lung damage: 1,4-dichlorobenzene or 1,4-DCB. You know what it smells like -- mothballs. It's most often used in room deodorizers, urinal and toilet-bowl blocks, and, yes, mothballs.

The 10% of people with the highest blood levels of 1,4-DCB did 4% worse in a test of lung function than the 10% of people with the lowest blood levels of the chemical, found Stephanie J. London, MD, and colleagues at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS).

The researchers called this a "modest reduction" in lung function. But they warn it could be serious for people who suffer asthma or other lung problems. And the reduced lung function test linked to 1,4-DCB is also a risk factor for heart disease, stroke, lung cancer, and death from any cause.

"Even a small reduction in lung function may indicate some harm to the lungs," London said, in a news release.

A 2005 study found that the risk of asthma in children age 6 months to 3 years goes up as their home 1,4-DCB exposure increases.

"This research suggests that 1,4-DCB may exacerbate respiratory diseases," said NIEHS director David A. Schwartz, MD, in a news release.
In some homes and public restrooms, the CDC has detected 1,4-DCB levels that exceed the Environmental Protection Agency's minimal risk limit for long-term exposure.

London suggests that people can limit their exposure to 1,4-DCB by reducing their use of products containing the chemical. But that may not be entirely successful.

A 1987 study by the Environmental Protection Agency found 1,4-DCB in the air of 80% of U.S. homes surveyed. Only a third of these homes used products containing the chemical.

The new findings appear in the August issue of Environmental Health Perspectives.
SOURCE: Elliott, L. Environmental Health Perspectives, August 2006; vol: 114 pp. 1210-1214.

Quiz: What Are You Breathing Inside?
Top 25 Towns for Clean Air, Dirty Air
Check Your Local Pollen Count
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I might be bored right now.




August 8, 2006

Tedious Pursuits

Boredom

The human mind thrives on novelty. What was once a source of pleasure can become tedious after a time. Though our lives are full, boredom lurks around every corner because we innately long for new experiences. Yet boredom by its very nature is passive. In this idle state of mind, we may feel frustrated at our inability to channel our mental energy into productive or engaging tasks. We may even attempt to lose ourselves in purposeless or self-destructive pursuits. While this can be a sign of depression, it can also be an invitation issued from your mind, asking you to challenge yourself. Boredom can become the motivation that drives you to learn, explore the exotic, experiment, and harness the boundless creative energy within.

In Hindu and Buddhist traditions, boredom is perceived as a pathway to self-awareness. Boredom itself is not detrimental to the soul-it is the manner in which we respond to it that determines whether it becomes a positive or a negative influence in our lives. When you respond by actively filling the emptiness you feel lurking in yourself, you cultivate creativity and innovation. If, when in the grip of boredom, you have difficulty acknowledging the merits of any activities you might otherwise enjoy, generate your own inspiration. Before you find yourself beset by boredom, create a list of tasks you can consult when it feels like there is simply nothing to do. Referring to a list of topics you want to learn more about, projects you've yet to begin, or even pending chores can spark your creative energy and reawaken your zest for life.

When we are troubled by boredom, it is not that there is nothing to do but rather that we are not stimulated by the options before us. A bored mind can be the canvas upon which innovation is painted and the womb in which novelty is nourished. When you identify boredom as a signal that you need to test your boundaries, it can be the force that presses you to strive for opportunities you thought were beyond your reach and to indulge your desire for adventure.
  • Current Mood
    bored hm. my mind lacks stimulation
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