Alli (neugotik) wrote,
Alli
neugotik

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fun words :p

I cut out some definitions, some word-history - will put behind cut tags so they post isn't long ;) EDIT: Ok I'll "uncut" just a couple choic outtakes, hee hee.

smarm·y Pronunciation[smahr-mee] –adjective
excessively or unctuously flattering, ingratiating, servile, etc.: "the emcee with the smarmy welcome."
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u·biq·ui·tous Pronunciation[yoo-bik-wi-tuhs] –adjective
existing or being everywhere, esp. at the same time; omnipresent: ubiquitous fog; "plodded through the shadows fruitlessly like an ubiquitous spook" (Joseph Heller).

& because I like it, from the "devil's dictionary": UBIQUITY, n.
The gift or power of being in all places at one time, but not in all places at all times, which is omnipresence, an attribute of God and the luminiferous ether only. This important distinction between ubiquity and omnipresence was not clear to the mediaeval Church and there was much bloodshed about it. Certain Lutherans, who affirmed the presence everywhere of Christ's body were known as Ubiquitarians. For this error they were doubtless damned, for Christ's body is present only in the eucharist, though that sacrament may be performed in more than one place simultaneously. In recent times ubiquity has not always been understood -- not even by Sir Boyle Roche, for example, who held that a man cannot be in two places at once unless he is a bird.
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sar·don·ic Pronunciation[sahr-don-ik] –adjective
characterized by bitter or scornful derision; mocking; cynical; sneering: a sardonic grin.
—Synonyms biting, mordant, contemptuous.

[Origin: 1630–40; alter. of earlier sardonian (influenced by F sardonique) < L sardoni(us) (< Gk sardónios of Sardinia) + -an; alluding to a Sardinian plant which when eaten was supposed to produce convulsive laughter ending in death] choice! lol.
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unc·tu·ous Pronunciation[uhngk-choo-uhs] –adjective
1. characterized by excessive piousness or moralistic fervor, esp. in an affected manner; excessively smooth, suave, or smug.
2. of the nature of or characteristic of an unguent or ointment; oily; greasy.
3. having an oily or soapy feel, as certain minerals. [Origin: 1350–1400; ME < ML ūnctuōsus, equiv. to L ūnctu(s) act of anointing (ung(uere) to smear, anoint + -tus suffix of v. action) + -ōsus -ous Middle English, from Old French unctueus, from Medieval Latin ūnctuōsus, from Latin ūnctum, ointment, from neuter past participle of unguere, to anoint.]
1387, "oily," from O.Fr. unctueus, from M.L. unctuosus "greasy," from L. unctus "act of anointing," from pp. stem of unguere "to anoint" (see unguent). Fig. sense of "blandly ingratiating" is first recorded 1742, perhaps in part with a literal sense, but in part a sarcastic usage from unction in the meaning "deep spiritual feeling" (1692), such as comes from having been anointed in the rite of unction.
ooh, another of my picks has a devil's dictionary call-out: UNCTION, n.
An oiling, or greasing. The rite of extreme unction consists in touching with oil consecrated by a bishop several parts of the body of one engaged in dying. Marbury relates that after the rite had been administered to a certain wicked English nobleman it was discovered that the oil had not been properly consecrated and no other could be obtained. When informed of this the sick man said in anger: "Then I'll be damned if I die!"
"My son," said the priest, "this is what we fear." heh.
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smit·ten Pronunciation[smit-n] –adjective
1. struck, as with a hard blow.
2. grievously or disastrously stricken or afflicted.
3. very much in love.
[Origin: 1200–50; ME; see smite, -en3]
–verb 4. a pp. of smite.
I like how "smitten" is such a loving word, & also hateful word all rolled into one, depending on context/use. ---------------------------------------------
e·da·cious Pronunciation[i-dey-shuhs] –adjective
devouring; voracious; consuming; Characterized by voracity; devouring. [Origin: 1810–20; edaci(ty) + -ous From Latin edāx, edāc-, from edere, to eat; see ed- in Indo-European roots.] related forms: e·dac'i·ty (ĭ-dās'ĭ-tē) (noun) "The edacity of what she did is unspeakable"
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(Not to be confuse with the similar sounding:)
vi·va·cious Pronunciation[vi-vey-shuhs, vahy-] –adjective
lively; animated; gay: "what a vivacious folk dance"
1. Having vigorous powers of life; tenacious of life; long-lived. [Obs.] "Hitherto the English bishops have been vivacious almost to wonder"
2. Sprightly in temper or conduct; lively; merry; as, a vivacious poet. "Vivacious nonsense." --V. Knox.
3. (Bot.) Living through the winter, or from year to year; perennial. [R.] Syn: Sprightly; active; animated; sportive; gay; merry; jocund; light-hearted.[Origin: 1635–45; vivaci(ty) + -ous] origins [Latin v['i]vax, -acis, French. vivere to live. See Vivid.]
—Synonyms spirited, brisk.
—Antonyms languid.
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sop·o·rif·ic Pronunciation[sop-uh-rif-ik, soh-puh-]
–adjective 1. causing or tending to cause sleep.
2. pertaining to or characterized by sleep or sleepiness; sleepy; drowsy.
–noun 3. something that causes sleep, as a medicine or drug.
[Origin: 1655–65; < L sopor sopor + -i- + -fic; cf. F soporifique 1690, from Fr. soporifique (1687), formed in Fr. from L. sopor (gen. soporis) "deep sleep," from a causative form of the PIE base *swep- "to sleep" (see somnolence).]
Tags: ideas, linguistics, stories
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