Alli (neugotik) wrote,
Alli
neugotik

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words!

a·wry Pronunciation[uh-rahy] –adverb, adjective
1. with a turn or twist to one side; askew: to glance or look awry.
2. away from the expected or proper direction; amiss; wrong: Our plans went awry.
[Origin: 1325–75; ME on wry. See a-1, wry]     A*wry"\, adv. & a. [Pref. a- + wry.]
1. Turned or twisted toward one side; not in a straight or true direction, or position; out of the right course; distorted; obliquely; asquint; with oblique vision; as, to glance awry. "Your crown's awry." --Shak.
Blows them transverse, ten thousand leagues awry. Into the devious air. --Milton.
2. Aside from the line of truth, or right reason; unreasonable or unreasonably; perverse or perversely.
Or by her charms Draws him awry, enslaved. --Milton.
Nothing more awry from the law of God and nature than that a woman should give laws to men. --Milton.
(Oooh Milton on the "bad boy" list tsk tsk)


sa·la·cious Pronunciation[suh-ley-shuhs] –adjective
1. lustful or lecherous.
2. (of writings, pictures, etc.) obscene; grossly indecent.
[Origin: 1635–45; < L salāci- (s. of salāx) lustful (deriv. of salīre to jump, move spasmodically, spurt; see salient, saltation) + -ous]
[From Latin salāx, salāc-, fond of leaping, lustful, from salīre, to leap; see sel- in Indo-European roots.]
1661, from L. salax (gen. salacis) "lustful," probably originally "fond of leaping," as in a male animal leaping on a female in sexual advances, from salire "to leap" (see salient). Earliest form of the word in Eng. is salacity (1605).
—Synonyms 1. lewd, wanton, lascivious, libidinous. 2. pornographic.
—Antonyms 1. modest.
adj. Appealing to or stimulating sexual desire; lascivious. Lustful; bawdy.


de·ter
Pronunciation[di-tur] –verb (used with object), -terred, -ter·ring.
1. to discourage or restrain from acting or proceeding: The large dog deterred trespassers.
2. to prevent; check; arrest: timber treated with creosote to deter rot.
[Origin: 1570–80; < L déterrére to prevent, hinder, equiv. to dé- de- + terrére to frighten]
[Latin dēterrēre : dē-, de- + terrēre, to frighten.]


ab·hor
Pronunciation[ab-hawr] –verb (used with object), -horred, -hor·ring.
to regard with extreme repugnance or aversion; detest utterly; loathe; abominate.
[Origin: 1400–50; late ME < L abhorrére to shrink back from, shudder at, equiv. to ab- ab- + horrére to bristle, tremble]
1449, from L. abhorrere "shrink back in terror," from ab- "away" + horrere "tremble at, shudder," lit. "to bristle, be shaggy," from PIE *ghers- "start out, stand out, rise to a point, bristle" (see horror).
verb   find repugnant; "I loathe that man"; "She abhors cats"


as·suage
Pronunciation[uh-sweyj, uh-sweyzh] –verb (used with object), -suaged, -suag·ing.
1. to make milder or less severe; relieve; ease; mitigate: to assuage one's grief; to assuage one's pain.
2. to appease; satisfy; allay; relieve: to assuage one's hunger.
3. to soothe, calm, or mollify: to assuage his fears; to assuage her anger.
[Origin: 1250–1300; ME aswagen < OF asouagier < VL *assuāviāre, equiv. to L as- as- + -suāviāre, v. deriv. of L suāvis agreeable to the taste, pleasant (cf. suave; akin to sweet)]
c.1300, from O.Fr. asouagier, from V.L. *adsuaviare, from L. ad- "to" + suavis "sweet, agreeable" (see sweet).
As*suage"\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Assuaged; p. pr. & vb. n. Assuaging.] [OE. asuagen, aswagen, OF. asoagier, asuagier, fr. assouagier, fr. L. ad + suavis sweet. See Sweet.] To soften, in a figurative sense; to allay, mitigate, ease, or lessen, as heat, pain, or grief; to appease or pacify, as passion or tumult; to satisfy, as appetite or desire.
Refreshing winds the summer's heat assuage. --Addison.
To assuage the sorrows of a desolate old man --Burke.
The fount at which the panting mind assuages Her thirst of knowledge. --Byron.
Syn: To alleviate; mitigate; appease; soothe; calm; tranquilize; relieve.
Tags: ideas, linguistics
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